Category Archives: Cars

C’était un Rendez-vous

C’était un Rendez-vous is a short film by French director Claude Lelouch, filmed in Paris in 1976. It features a Ferrari 275 being driven at high speed at 5.30am, past several landmarks in Paris. The film attracted criticisim at the time of its release due to the recklessness of the driver. Well-known landmarks such as the Arc de Triomphe, Opéra Garnier, and Place de la Concorde with its obelisk are passed, as well as the Champs-Élysées. Pedestrians are passed, pigeons sitting on the streets are scattered, red lights are ignored, one-way streets are driven up the wrong way, center lines are crossed, the car drives on the sidewalk to avoid a garbage truck. The car is never seen as the camera seems to be attached below the front bumper. The final shot shows the car is parked in front of a curb on Montmartre, with the famous Sacré Cœur Basilica behind. Here, the driver gets out and embraces a young blonde woman as bells ring in the background, with the famous backdrop of Paris. I love this short film for the rush it gives me whilst watching it. The sound of the engine is so engrossing, and watching the car dance through the awakening Parisian streets is like poetry in motion. I can’t help but have the hairs on the back of my neck stand up whilst watching this.

Ferrari 458 Italia

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via Serious Wheels

The 2010 Ferrari 458 Italia is the replacement for the current F430 car, currently the best selling car from this desirable Italian marquee. I think its design is a big step forward from Ferrari. Its sharp lines and world leading aerodynamic shape are a leap ahead for Ferrari. The V8 engine is more powerful and efficient and less polluting than its predecessor, while the cutting edge design has already won plaudits from the automobile world. It features LED running lights, a first for Ferrari, and its drag co-efficient is the lowest of any model produced by the Maranello based company. I love the shape and lines of this car, and the way form and function work well together to produce a startling silhouette.